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Tuesday, February 13, 2007

Reversible Destiny


Here's the latest in "senior" housing. It's true I've been pretty bored by the local alternatives I've seen. Still.....
The $750,000 Reversible Destiny Lofts in Tokyo resemble a psychedelic jumble of kids' blocks.
These "challenging" condos are intended to delay senescence in their elderly residents by forcing them to stay alert and defend themselves from architectural peccadillos.
Most people, in choosing a new home, look for comfort: a serene atmosphere, smooth walls and floors, a logical layout. Nonsense, says Shusaku Arakawa, a Japanese artist based in New York. He and his creative partner, poet Madeline Gins, recently unveiled a small apartment complex in the Tokyo suburb of Mitaka that is anything but comfortable and calming. "People, particularly old people, shouldn't relax and sit back to help them decline," he insists. "They should be in an environment that stimulates their senses and invigorates their lives."
With that in mind, Arakawa and Gins designed a building of nine apartments known as Reversible Destiny Lofts. Painted in eye-catching blue, pink, red, yellow and other bright colors, the building resembles the indoor playgrounds that attract toddlers at fast-food restaurants. Inside, each apartment features a dining room with a grainy, surfaced floor that slopes erratically, a sunken kitchen and a study with a concave floor. Electric switches are located in unexpected places on the walls so you have to feel around for the right one. A glass door to the veranda is so small you have to bend to crawl out. You constantly lose balance and gather yourself up, grab onto a column and occasionally trip and fall.

3 Comments:

Blogger AlexanderTheGreat said...

Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm..............

12:19 PM  
Blogger SuperMom said...

Yikes!

1:18 PM  
Anonymous beecher said...

I'd stick with gardening, bridge and blogging to stay sharp. These sound like a nightmare!

10:10 PM  

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